Dvd To Mkv Mkvtoolnix

This article will guide you through the steps of ripping a Blu-ray disc, demux it and then remux it to mkv format. This way you will get a huge, but unprotected, easy to use and store mkv file that contains the exact video and audio streams as your Blu-ray disc quality and size-wise. You can then use this file as input for another program, use any player to watch it in about any platform or just store it in your hard drive as a backup.

Jul 16, 2010 Using the DVD to Mobile (to MKV) option you can select multiple episodes. The odd thing (and I don’t know why this happens) is that the same episode may show up multiple times. You can either select all titles that you think are episodes and sort out afterwards, or determine the exact episode per title and only select those (in the Tips.

You will need the programs below for this guide. Click on the links to download them straight from our downloads database.

Step 1

Before you start processing your disc you need to use an unlocking software to circumvent the Blu-ray's protection. I really suggest you let AnyDVD HD do that job. You can download it here or check the authors page here. Install it and forget it is even there. It will do all its work on the background.

  1. The MKV format can store multiple video/audio tracks with all meta-information and preserve chapters. There are many players that can play MKV files nearly on all platforms, and there are tools to convert MKV files to many formats, including DVD and Blu-ray discs.
  2. I have not demuxed an HD DVD and then remuxed it into an M2TS file, but it worked from my blu ray Planet Earth test rip. I have never used RipBot and because I didn't want to screw with my codec setup, so I went to handbrake. I converted to an.mkv file to keep the original Dolby Digital (AC3) audio, and it works perfectly, audio and all.
  3. When I went looking on the Internet, I found few resources for moving from DVD to MKV, and everything that did talk about it actually reencoded the DVD video to get it into its final destination. Since Matroska can contain all of the codecs native to DVDs, I wanted to transfer everything losslessly.
  4. Apr 19, 2010 MakeMKV is available for Windows, Mac, Linux and will rip and convert DVDs to MKV files. Not all media players natively support MKV playback, so if you’re having trouble playing MKV files, try downloading VLC Media player, or the latest version of the DivX codec.

Step 2

Open up BDInfo. Using this application we will determine in which files the main movie is and what streams we need. Browse (1) and select the BDMV folder in your Blu-ray disc. Check out which playlist contains the movie (2), obviously the one with the biggest length and check its name. In this example, our Blu-ray uses seamless branching, in plain words it has a 'Director's Cut' feature and it uses various smaller m2ts files (3) you can see in the list below. That is why we have one bigger playlist, and another one a bit smaller. In normal Blu-rays you will only have one big playlist and one m2ts file. Make sure that in the various video and audio streams area (4) you right down the fps value of the video, in this example 23.976. Now, leave BDInfo open and run tsMuxeR

Step 3

To start, add (1) the playlist file that we have already found in BDInfo. tsMuxeR will automatically load all the m2ts files assosiated with it. Now we have our main movie loaded and ready for extraction. Select the main video track, the audio that you want to keep and any subtitles (2) you may need later on. Then set output to Demux (3) and after you set the location of the output files, click Start demuxing (4).

Step 4

tsMuxeR will now copy the tracks you have selected to your hard drive. This process will take from about 45 to 90 minutes, depending on the speed of your Blu-ray drive and the size of the disc. When it is done, click OK and close tsMuxeR. Next step is to create our mkv file, so run mkvmerge GUI (named mmg.exe in the archive you have downloaded).

Step 5

First of all, we need to set as input all the files that tsMuxeR created, so click add (1) and select all the files that we demuxed before (2). You can also add subtitles in Blu-ray's .sup format. Now we need to set some options. Select the video track (3), set the language (4) and then click the Format specific options (5) tab.

Step 6

Here you need to add the FPS value exactly as the one you wrote down at Step 2.

Step 7

Feel free to add the correct language to any other audio or subtitle tracks you may have and when you are ready Browse (1) to set the output filename and click Start muxing (2) in order to start the process.

Step 8

That's it. A few minutes later you will have an mkv file containing the exact video and audio streams of your Blu-ray disc. You should delete all the files tsMuxeR created as you no longer need them. You can now test your mkv file using any player that supports that format and then use it as you please.

One common question I see asked is what is the best way to rip a TV Series Boxset. The biggest issue with TV Series Boxsets is that it is not particularly user friendly with episodes spanning across multiple discs. I have found that ripping each episode individually works the best, especially considering that most front ends have nice interfaces to manage TV shows. Almost a year ago I had documented several different ways to rip individual TV episodes, so I thought this would be a good opportunity to revisit the topic. Lets take a look at some of the popular software out there that can be used to create individual episodes, with a focus on mkv.

MakeMKV:

  • Tools – MakeMKV
  • Additional Resources – Writeup
  • Media Type: DVD, HD DVD, and Blu Ray
  • Output File: .mkv
  • Decrypter Needed: No (for DVDs/Blu Ray that MakeMKV cannot decrypt then Yes)
  • Encoding – No
  • Retain Original Video/Audio: Yes
  • Batch Mode: Yes
  • Cost – Free while in Beta, see here for beta license key
  • Comments: This is a great program that I use often to create MKVs from my Blu Ray / HD DVDs / SD DVDs. It is very easy to pick out the individual episodes versus other extras. There is no good way to determine which Title is which episode, so once the mkvs are created you will need to play back and determine which mkv is which episode. When other programs have not worked (some of my boxset tv shows EAC3To does not correctly pick up the individual episodes) MakeMKV has always come through. No encoding options available though, so if you want to encode use another program (or use MakeMKV to create an mkv and then encode the created mkv with another program)

From the screenshot below you can see there are 6 episodes (the giveaways are the chapters and the file sizes). Simply put a check next to each Title you want to rip, specify your Output folder, click the MakeMKV icon, and away you go.

DVDFab

  • Tools – DVDFab
  • Additional Resources – MediaSmartServer Wiki I wrote
  • Media Type: DVD, HD DVD (DVDFab only), and Blu Ray (DVDFab only)
  • Output File: vob, mpeg, ts, mkv, avi, mp4, etc…
  • Decrypter Needed: No
  • Encoding – Yes
  • Retain Original Video/Audio: Yes
  • Batch Mode: No
  • Cost: Free trial, however to convert to mkv requires the “DVD to Mobile” or “Blu Ray to Mobile” feature (prices range from USD 30-USD 60 depending on the subscription selected)
  • Comments: This is probably the most comprehensive and feature rich program out there. However, the cost may scare away some people, especially if they have already paid for other software such as AnyDVD. If you already have AnyDVD I would recommend skipping DVDFab and using other free software available. With DVDFab you have the option to encode to various formats/profiles which may come in handy if you have different devices accessing the file (such as mobile, iPad, etc…)

Using the DVD to Mobile (to MKV) option you can select multiple episodes. The odd thing (and I don’t know why this happens) is that the same episode may show up multiple times. You can either select all titles that you think are episodes and sort out afterwards, or determine the exact episode per title and only select those (in the Tips & Tricks section at the bottom of this writeup)

You can select/edit multiple profiles to use when creating the mkv.

Similar to DVD to Mobile except for Blu Rays.

MKV Profile options for Blu Ray to MKV. You can either choose to encode or keep in its original format (i.e. Pas through / same as source)

Hd-dvd To Mkv

  • Tools – Handbrake
  • Additional Resources – N/A
  • Media Type: DVD and Blu-ray
  • Output File: .mp4, .mkv
  • Decrypter Needed: Yes (such as AnyDVD)
  • Encoding – Yes
  • Retain Original Video: No /Audio: Yes
  • Cost – Free
  • Batch Mode: Yes
  • Comments: For encoding DVD TV boxsets this is my program of choice as it picks up all the episodes and has some preset profiles that come in handy. An alternative if you want to encode would be to use a program like MakeMKV to create and mkv, and then run the mkv through handbrake.
  • UPDATE – Handbrake now works with Blu-rays, at the time I wrote this guide it did not

To get started, select the Source that Handbrake should use.

After Handbrake is done scanning the source, select the Title (i.e. episode) you want to encode

With the Title selected you can then select what container you want to use (MKV or MP4) and also select what Profile you want to use (you can choose any of the default profiles or create your own). I prefer to use the High Profile and leave the settings as is, but don’t be afraid to get creative!

Once everything is set click on the “Add to Queue” button which will add the encoding job to the Handbrake queue

You can either hit the “Encode” button to start the encoding process, or you can add additional jobs (keep adding to the Queue) and process multiple files.

As each job is processed a DOS prompt will appear showing the progress.

Ripbot264:

  • Tools – Ripbot264, AVISynth, ffdshow, Haali Media Splitter, Microsoft .Net Framework 3.5
  • Additional Resources – MediaSmartServer Wiki I wrote
  • Media Type: DVD, HD DVD, and Blu Ray
  • Output File: .mp4, .mkv, AVCHD
  • Decrypter Needed: Yes (such as AnyDVD)
  • Encoding – Yes
  • Retain Original Video: No /Audio: No (for HD Audio)
  • Batch Mode: Yes
  • Comments: For encoding Blu Ray/ HD DVDs this is the tool I prefer to use. However, the big drawback for me is that Ripbot264 does not allow you to retain the original HD Audio (i.e. DTSMA or TrueHD) so I end up using Ripbot264 to encode the video, HdBrStreamExtractor to extract the original HD Audio, and MKVMerge to remux everything back into an MKV. I find Ripbot264 does not work well for DVD TV Boxsets so I don’t use.

Click on “Add” when you first load Ripbot264 to add an encoding job.

Under “Video” click the “…” button. You will need to navigate to the folder where the Blu Ray / HD DVDs video files are stored. It doesn’t matter what file you choose, just pick one.

Once you pick a video file Ripbot264 will analyze the disc and show you all available playlists to choose from. In the screenshot below you can see the two episode playlists (each approx 42 minutes) , so choose one of those playlists and select “OK”.

After hitting “Ok” Ripbot264 will demux the audio/video streams. This should take about 5 minutes to complete.

Once demuxing has completed all the settings should be populated. You can choose what Profile you wan to use (I stick with High 4.0 HD). You can adjust the audio options and you can select what encoding mode you want to use (Constant Quality) or 2-Pass. I prefer to use CQ and set the CRF factor at 20 (the smaller the CRF factor the better the quality and the bigger the file size). I have found either 18 or 20 yields the best results. If you instead want to hit a target bitrate or filesize you would choose 2-Pass.

Dvd To Mkv Mkvtoolnix

The one adjustment I like to make it to the Picture Properties. Click on the “Properties” button next to CRF. There are several different screens you can navigate through, but I usually only make changes to the first screen. I like to set Crop to “Automatically” to remove the black bars if any and also lock the size in to 1920×1080.

Dvd converter mkv

Once all settings are where you like, hit the “Done” button which will take you back to the Welcome Ripbot264 screen. You can edit the current job, add a new job, or begin the encoding process.

Once the encoding begins you will see a progress monitor at the bottom of the screen. Depending on your chosen settings and PC specs, the process can take anywhere from an hour to 6+ hours.

Another EAC3To GUI:

  • Tools – Another EAC3To GUI, ffdshow, Haali Media Splitter, eac3to,MKVToolnix,Java,BDSup2Sub
  • Additional Resources – Writeup
  • Media Type: HD DVD, and Blu Ray
  • Output File: .mkv
  • Decrypter Needed: Yes (such as AnyDVD)
  • Encoding – No
  • Retain Original Video/Audio: Yes
  • Batch Mode: Yes
  • Cost – Free
  • Comments: This is another great program that I use often to create MKVs from my Blu Rays. No encoding options available though, so if you want to encode use another program (or use MakeMKV to create an mkv and then encode the created mkv with another program). Another EAC3To GUI relies on EAC3To to gather the playlist. For whatever reason I have encountered a few issues with EAC3To where is doesn’t pull the correct playlists, so in a case like that using Another EAC3To GUI doesn’t work for me, and I switch over to MakeMKV.

Screenshot below showing the multiple playlists (you can choose one at a time and add to the batch to run all at once)

Dvd To Mkv Free

Tips & Tricks:

  • Always check the files you output once completed. Don’t assume the encode/rip went ok without confirming first, even if the same process/settings have worked in the past.
  • Blu Rays that are 1080i VC-1 I have found to be problematic. The best process I have found is to encode them (even if you don’t want to ) to h264.
  • Any process that involves encoding is going to take a lot longer and require more CPU (i.e. using handbrake, ripbot264) then just doing a rip/remux (MakeMKV, Clown_BD)
  • I find the best naming convention is to create a main folder with the show name, sub folders for each season, and then S##E## within each Season folder (i.e. Supernatutal -> Season 1 -> S01E01). You can then use a program called TV Rename to get the full names of each episode (see blog post here)
  • One item that is a PITA is figuring out exactly what episode you are ripping. What I usually do is play the dvd that I am ripping in a program like PowerDVD or WMP, go to the episode selection menu and select each episode. When the episode plays in the bottom right corner of PowerDVD it will tell me the title # of the episode, which I can then use as a cross reference when ripping/encoding as well as cross reference against TVDB. As last resort, you can always figure out what episode is what buy playing an episode from the actual disc and then playing back the created mkvs until you find the corresponding one.

Using PowerDVD when you play an episode in the bottom right corner it should show the Title# of that episode

In Windows Media Player there will be sideways triangle next to the Title #. In the example below, the episode being played is Title 7.

Final Thoughts:

Once your episode mkvs have been created and named properly, you can now use your favorite Front End for a much better experience. Obviously the process is a little more involved then just ripping a movie. It is also not necessary to rip out each episode, but for me this provides the most rewarding experience and has the highest WAF. The best bet is to try a few different methods to find which one works best for your setup.

Screenshot of XBMC

Screenshot of Media Browser (Windows Media Center)


Article by Damian

Hi, my name is Damian, and I'm tech gadget addict! Although I always had some interest in technology, it wasn't until I got my EX470 and more importantly found Mediasmartserver.net, that my interest became an addiction. My goal, aside from world domination and to see the Mets/Broncos win another championship, is to set up the perfect digital home where all my media is available at the click of a button. When I am not writing for Mediasmartserver.net you can find me over at my blog at http://www.adigitalhomeblog.com or follow me on twitter


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